Legal Questions

What must a plaintiff prove to recover for an assault or battery?

The terms assault and battery are often erroneously used interchangeably. An assault can be defined as the threat to use unlawful force to inflict bodily injury upon another. The threat, which must be believed to be imminent, must cause reasonable apprehension in the plaintiff. Therefore, where the defendant has threatened some use of force, creating an apprehension in the plaintiff, an assault has occurred. The focus, for the purpose of determining whether a particular act is an assault, must be upon the reasonableness of the plaintiff’s reaction.

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How do I Choose a Personal Injury Attorney?

If you have decided to pursue your personal injury claim, you will want to start researching attorneys to assist you with your claim. There are a number of factors you should consider when choosing the right attorney for your situation. Most often, you will want to hire an attorney who has experience with claims similar to yours. Look for an attorney who practices personal injury law, this will help ensure he or she is knowledgeable in this area of law, keeps up to date on any new developments in the law, has a record of past successes and verdicts in personal injury law and may have relationship and reputation with other legal professionals in the personal injury law forum, which

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How do I Know if I Have a Personal Injury Case?

To have a personal injury action you must have suffered harm. The harm may be an injury to your person or personal property. It can also be the perception of harm, such as a threat (assault), which caused emotional injury. Your injury must be the result of an action or omission of another and must not have been caused by your own actions or negligence. If you feel you have suffered an injury at the hands of another, you may have a personal injury claim. It is important to discuss your possible claim with a personal injury attorney in your area. Different types of claims must be filed within a certain amount of time, or you cannot file your claim.

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How do Insurers Determine What a Car is Worth?

Insurers keep proprietary databases on car prices, similar to the Blue Book or the National Auto Dealers Association (NADA) Official Used Car Guide. The insurer’s valuation of your car is mostly based on its age. So, for example, your car might be totaled if it’s thirteen years old and receives only minor damage, and it might not be if it’s a brand new Porsche that has been in a devastating collision. If your automobile is “totaled,” that means that it would cost more to fix your car then the car is worth. Most auto insurance contracts contain a provision that states if your car is damaged in an accident, your insurer does not have to pay you more than your

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Who Is Responsible for Birth Injuries?

During the delivery of a child, injuries sometimes occur. Often these injuries are not avoidable. However, at times injuries are the result of medical negligence and may have been prevented if responded to properly and with adequate care. If your child suffered preventable injuries during birth, there may be a number of people held responsible, including the doctor, other hospital employees and/or the hospital. It depends on the type of injury your child suffered and the circumstances surrounding the injury. In many cases, the physician who performed the birth may be held accountable for his or her own actions (if negligent) or the actions of employees under his or her supervision, such as nurses, medical residents or interns, other physicians

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